Escenario Todoroki Building / Sasaki Architecture


Escenario Todoroki Building / Sasaki Architecture

© Takumi Ota Photography© Takumi Ota Photography© Takumi Ota Photography© Takumi Ota Photography+ 31

© Takumi Ota Photography
© Takumi Ota Photography

Text description provided by the architects. This is a 16-unit residential complex near Todoroki Ravine, the only ravine in central Tokyo. We wanted the facade to have some sort of correspondence with the Todoroki ravine as the surrounding environment. The building faces the main road, and the approach to the entrance, set back from the road, is a space that takes the visitor into a universe reminiscent of the valley.

© Bauhaus Neo
© Bauhaus Neo

Basically, the shape used is a square that can be easily recognized in a primitive way, and it is developed into openings and hollow walls that resemble a valley, so that townspeople and residents can remember a vision of the world. Hot-dip galvanized sheets in openings and recessed walls reflect everyday weather conditions, as do automobiles, bicycles and people constantly passing by.

© Takumi Ota Photography
© Takumi Ota Photography
First floor plan
First floor plan
© Takumi Ota Photography
© Takumi Ota Photography

The units range from studio to one bedroom and are designed with large square openings to let in space, light and wind. The units on the west side have a view of the Todoroki Valley through the openings. The living units combine a simple design with a high degree of freedom in the composition of the space. White walls and concrete walls are used to express the contrast of materials.

© Takumi Ota Photography
© Takumi Ota Photography
Section
Section
© Bauhaus Neo
© Bauhaus Neo

The spatial relationship between living room, dining room and bedroom can be changed according to the needs of each resident. In addition, by creating a partially enclosed space in the living room, we planned to create a space that could serve as a walk-in closet or a compact computer cubicle, and we also created a square opening in the wall so that the space can expand. . By adding a sense of play through the use of materials and space, based on minimalism, we offer a form of wealth that is not dominated by things and a life without possessions.

© Takumi Ota Photography
© Takumi Ota Photography



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